Date of Award

8-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering (Holcomb Dept. of)

Committee Member

Ramtin Hadidi, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Curtiss Fox

Committee Member

Johan H Enslin

Abstract

With the prominence of high speed, MW class motor usage in various industries such as the petrochemical and natural gas sectors, advancements in related technologies allow for achievable benefits such as increased energy efficiency, compressed power density, and cost savings. A novel high frequency variable speed drive (VSD) and motor system is being developed by Clemson University and TECO-Westinghouse Motor Company through a Department of Energy (DOE) project. In order to test this prototype, a dynamometer setup is required, involving another induction motor, another motor drive, and a gearbox. The system is modeled and simulated through MATLAB/Simulink in order to predict system behavior, control propagation, and protection limits. Individual parts of the system are individually modeled and evaluated before integrating the entire system together in software.

Simulation of the various components involve a plethora of parameters, settings, and topologies to be researched and analyzed. V/Hz is used as the control method for the motors involved in the system. Voltage sources are modeled to represent this method and output desired waveforms. Both speed and torque outputs on the machines are managed in specific manners to evaluate desired performance. Open loop and closed loop controls are explored and expressed through the results. An equation is given to relate the V/Hz setpoints of both high speed and low speed sides of the integrated system to conduct a full load test. Through these simulation efforts, actual system test procedures can be established and safety concerns can be assessed.

Share

COinS