Date of Award

5-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Committee Member

Margaret D Condrasky, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Vivian Haley-Zitlin

Committee Member

William Bridges

Committee Member

Bridgit Corbett

Committee Member

Sarah Griffin

Abstract

The World Health Organization predicts that two-thirds of all disease around the globe will be the result of lifestyle choices by the year 2020. Increasing obesity rates contribute to these climbing numbers. The direct relation between obesity and comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type II Diabetes, and hypertension cannot be denied. Obesity is directly associated with higher risks of developing CVD, Type II Diabetes, hypertension, and many other health conditions. All of the aforementioned health conditions are associated with physical activity, nutrition and other lifestyle behaviors. In order to combat these extremely prevalent health conditions, it is ideal to prevent these conditions before they ever occur.

The practice of preventive medicine and lifestyle medicine are becoming more common. However, it is nationally recognized that the U.S. healthcare curricula does not currently teach healthcare providers the necessary knowledge required for exercise and nutrition competencies. In response to this deficit in the medical education curriculum, programs such as the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine (GCCM) at Tulane University School of Medicine are becoming increasingly popular. At this point, over fifty medical schools have implemented the GCCM program into their curriculum. Many lifestyle medicine, preventive medicine, culinary medicine and culinary nutrition programs are effectively helping healthcare providers and patients adopt healthier lifestyles.

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