Date of Award

8-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Committee Member

Dr. Eric Muth, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Dr. Elliot Jesch

Committee Member

Dr. Benjamin Stephens

Abstract

This study aimed to determine if viewing bite count in real time had the same effect as viewing visible food records to decrease intake during a meal. Behavioral intervention is the most common treatment used to lower food consumption. This includes the idea of self-monitoring food intake through a variety of methods like bite counting. Another factor that leads to the reduction of food consumption is the presence of feedback. This feedback can take the form of visible food records such as chicken bones, candy wrappers, or bottle caps. In this study, chicken wings were used as the visible food record and compared to a bite counting display. A 2x2 between-subjects study was conducted with the following conditions: bones/bite group, bones/no bite group, no bones/bite group, no bones/no bite group. An effect of food waste was hypothesized such that individuals would consume fewer grams when the chicken bones were present. The main effect of bone presence was found to be significant (F(1,88)=3.314, p<0.05, ηp2=0.036). Additionally, an effect of bite count was hypothesized such that individuals would consume fewer grams when bite count was present. The main effect of bite presence was not significant (F(1,88)=0.014, p=0.45, ηp2=.00). Finally, no interaction between food waste and bite count was hypothesized such that individuals would consume the fewest grams when both were present and the most grams when neither were present. A significant interaction was observed for bite count presence and bone presence (F(1,88)=3.187, p<0.05, ηp2=0.035).

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