Date of Award

5-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Historic Preservation (MHP)

Department

Planning, Development, and Preservation

Committee Member

Amalia Leifeste, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Dr. Carter Hudgins

Committee Member

Ralph Muldrow

Committee Member

Richard Marks

Committee Member

Robert Morgan

Abstract

The United States Forest Service was established as a federal agency to oversee the nation’s timber production and protect its watersheds. With the acquisition of large tracts of public land came the acquisition of historic structures located on these lands. While the US Forest Service is focused on land management, it still has a duty to protect and properly manage all of the resources under its care, historic ones included. This thesis compares the different management structures of the US Forest Service with the National Parks Service, two federal agencies who own federal lands, one of which focuses on land management and the other which has a dual focus on land management and historic resource management, and the level of stewardship to federally owned historic resources that result from the contrasting institutional organization framework. The US Forest Service’s management of its historic buildings in South Carolina is objectively examined through an analysis of public policy, site conditions, and owner surveys compared to the National Parks Service. The hypothesis of this thesis is affirmed: National Parks Service properties are better cared for than US Forest Service properties and that this difference is rooted in layers of institutional organizational framework. As it currently stands, the US Forest Service is not set up to care for historic structures. Methods to remedy the gap in care include implementing new legislation, changing existing legislation, public-private partnerships, and increased funding.

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