Date of Award

5-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering (Holcomb Dept. of)

Committee Member

Pingshan Wang, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Todd Hubing

Committee Member

Adam Hoover

Committee Member

Anthony Q. Martin

Committee Member

Jeong-Rock Yoon

Abstract

This dissertation develops methods how to design wire harnesses reducing common mode components and to analyze the conversion from differential mode to common mode. The three chapters presented are design methods how to figure out the impact of the common-mode components, not only describe the test results but provide important insight as to how the design related to radiated emissions. In the first chapter of this dissertation, the method designing wire harnesses has been presented to match the electrical balance of the circuit board (PCB). This is accomplished via calculating the current division factor (CDF) of the wire harnesses and the PCB, which provides us with the electrical balance of a transmission line. To reduce the amount of common-mode currents induced on the harness, matching the imbalance of the wire harness to the imbalance of its source and termination is essential. The second chapter explores Controller Area Network (CAN) characteristics. Unintentional common-mode components of the CAN transceivers are analyzed and evaluated to determine how much common-mode voltage they produce in various circumstances. The final chapter provide valuable understanding such that ground proximity impacts on the common-mode currents of wire harnesses. The electrical balance change of the wire harness depending on the distance from ground structures is highlighted. It is also analyzed that losing the ground wire impacts on the common-mode excitation.

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