Date of Award

5-2009

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Educational Leadership

Advisor

Williams, Frankie K

Committee Member

Williams, Frankie K

Committee Member

Cawthon, Tony

Committee Member

Nault, Eleanor

Committee Member

Satterfield, James

Abstract

The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if differences existed between male and female graduate students regarding their perceptions, observations, and practices of academic integrity; and (2) to explore differences among graduate students by program areas regarding their perceptions, observations, and practices of academic integrity. Additionally, this study examined and explored graduate students' responses to open-ended questions pertaining to changes in support of academic integrity and the role students should play in this process. This study was guided by twelve research questions and ten null hypotheses. Bandura's social learning theory which established that patterns of behavior may be learned from observing others' behavior, framed the study. The study included the analysis of an existing data set from a survey research design conducted by the Center for Academic Integrity. Mean scores were calculated for males and females and by program majors related to perceptions, observations, and practices of academic integrity. Nvivo8 was used to qualitatively analyze open-ended questions. Major findings from both quantitative and open-ended data were triangulated to aid in establishing conclusions.

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