Date of Award

8-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Legacy Department

Applied Psychology

Advisor

Muth, Eric

Committee Member

Hoover , Adam

Committee Member

Pagano , Chris

Abstract

The purpose of the current experiment was to contribute to the existing literature on the relationship between frequency of latency and amplitude of latency and simulator sickness experienced in a head mounted display (HMD). Motion sickness has been studied for decades in a variety of vehicles including ships, planes, trains and automobiles. More recently virtual environments, including those utilizing an HMD have been shown to generate significant sickness, often termed simulator sickness. Many studies have linked system latency to simulator sickness and recent research has found that with current technology latency is not a constant; but rather it varies systematically over time due to sensor errors and clock asynchronization. One hundred twenty participants were recruited and randomly assigned to one of four conditions (0.2 Hz frequency of latency with 100 ms fixed amplitude of sinusoidal latency; 0.2 Hz frequency of latency with 20 - 100 ms varying amplitude of sinusoidal latency; 1.0 Hz frequency of latency with 100 ms fixed amplitude of sinusoidal latency; 1.0 Hz frequency of latency with 20 - 100 ms varying amplitude of sinusoidal latency). Collected data were analyzed using analysis of variance. A main effect of frequency of latency was found, and data trended toward a main effect of amplitude of latency. Participants reported greater sickness in 0.2 Hz frequency conditions and in the 1 Hz varying amplitude condition, indicating both frequency and amplitude of latency contribute to simulator sickness and are important factors to consider in regard to system latency. In conclusion, both frequency and amplitude of latency play an important role in simulator sickness.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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