Date of Award

8-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management

Committee Member

Skye Arthur-Banning, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Brandi Crowe

Committee Member

Kyle Young

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of an exclusive, residential cerebral palsy (CP) soccer camp on social identity for youth with CP. Using a phenomenological approach, the aim of this study was to explain the six-day CP soccer camp experience from the camper's perspective, guided by the three processes of Social Identity Theory (SIT), to determine if a CP soccer camp setting impacted the development of the participant's social identity. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were collected online through a video software from 13 participants who were purposefully sampled between the ages of 10-18. Qualitative data was initially analyzed through a deductive coding lens, then further analyzed through an inductive coding process. Results: Findings suggest that participation in an exclusive, residential CP soccer camp supported two of the three processes in SIT and provided opportunities for youth with CP to feel connected and similar to others with disabilities. Participants enjoyed being around other individuals with CP in a supportive sport environment. Conclusion: This study indicated that CP soccer camp assisted in the camper's social identity development in two of the three processes of SIT. Future research implications are discussed.

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