Date of Award

8-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management

Committee Member

Skye Arthur Banning, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Brent Hawkins

Committee Member

Robert Brookover

Abstract

Injuries are one of the common risks associated with physical activity, and in certain populations, injury prevention methods are used to improve the leisure experience for participants. At the collegiate level of sports participation, NCAA sports programs are required to provide injury treatment and prevention options for their athletes. For participants competing in club and intramural sports, no universal requirements for injury prevention and treatment exist. This study assessed the risk of injury during sports participation at the club and intramural level in a college-aged population. Campus recreation incident reports and Certified Athletic Trainer evaluations were used to document the activity, type, frequency, and location of injury in this population. Club sport participants were found to have a significantly higher overall rate of injury compared to previously documented injury rates in NCAA participants, while, both NCAA and club sports participants were found to be more at risk than intramural participants. Club sport participants were also found to be more at risk of suffering a head, neck, upper extremity, lower extremity, and back injury than NCAA participants. Specific sport injury rates were documented for nine club sports and compared with NCAA injury data. These injury rates suggest a need for improved health care and preventative treatment options for club sport athletes, especially men's and women's club rugby.

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