Date of Award

8-2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

International Family and Community Studies

Advisor

Small, Mark

Committee Member

McDonell , Jim

Committee Member

Limber , Sue

Committee Member

Holaday , Bonnie

Abstract

Utilizing data collected from 194 past and present members of Muslim Student Associations located across the United States, this study examined predictors of Muslim religious identity. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between Muslim religious identity and self-identification, sense of belonging, affirmation, religious involvement in ritual practices, family characteristics, peer characteristics, structured organizational involvement, area of residence, college, and the experience of a terror event such as September 11, 2001. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to assess whether the experience of a terror event explained a significant proportion of the variance in Muslim religious identity. The analyses found that self-identification, sense of belonging, affirmation, suburban area of residence, and the experience of a terror event significantly predicted Muslim religious identity. The study further found that although the experience of a terror event did explain a significant proportion of Muslim religious identity, self-identification, sense of belonging, affirmation, and area of residence were stronger predictors of Muslim religious identity. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Included in

Religion Commons

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