Date of Award

8-2008

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Advisor

Britt, Thomas

Committee Member

Moore , DeWayne

Committee Member

Raymark , Patrick

Committee Member

Pury , Cindy

Abstract

The current study proposed a model that incorporated a positive psychological approach into the person-environment fit domain. Within a longitudinal investigation, person-organization fit, person-job fit, and person-supervisor fit were examined in relationship to both organizational and employee outcomes through direct and indirect paths. Psychological empowerment and specific positive psychological states were examined as sequential moderators of the various proposed relationships. This study's sample consisted of 174 patient health care employees, excluding nurses and practitioners. In addition, supervisor ratings of performance were collected for the sole purposes of this study. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test the proposed measurement and structural models. Results provided partial support for the proposed model, such that psychological empowerment, optimism, self-efficacy, and engagement in work were found to be proximal outcomes of needs-supply fit. In addition, through the process of sequential mediation, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, intentions to quit, and coworker/organizational support were found to be longitudinal outcomes of needs-supply fit.
This research highlights the importance of using a multi-dimensional approach to examining person-environment fit, as significant results were found for needs-supply fit, but not for demands-ability fit, person-organization fit, nor person-supervisor fit. The novel contributions of this study, as well as the implications of the results for practitioners, are discussed.

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