Date of Award

5-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design

Committee Member

Victor J. Vitanza

Committee Member

Chenjerai Kumanyika

Committee Member

Jillian Weise

Committee Member

Christina Hung

Abstract

Hip-Hop Studies, while pushing boundaries in some respects, particularly the intersections of many different disciplines, reproduces certain forms of – and assumptions about – knowledge production. Additionally, some conventions in the discipline and certain types of scholarly performances of Hip-Hop scholarship render blackness pathological – even in the service of combating what is understood to be antiblackness, by virtue of attempts to combat the notion that Hip-Hop culture is, in fact, deviant or bad or unworthy of study – and are complicit in the denial of what P. Khalil Saucier and Tyron Woods describe as “black sentient humanity and the complex interplay between culture and historical context ” in the field [276]. “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes & Revolutions” serves as one of many possible explorations and analyses of this broader problem.

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