Date of Award

5-2008

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Educational Leadership

Advisor

Flanigan, Jackson

Committee Member

Whitwell , Ted

Committee Member

Deuink , James

Committee Member

Campbell , Mike

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to analyze the presidential transition at Northland Baptist Bible College and compare it to the current literature on presidential transition with respect to the grounded theory of social legitimacy. The context of the examination was the presidential transition of a long-time president leaving office and passing the mantle to a younger, incoming president. The methods for this research study were qualitative and phenomenological in nature.
The data was collected through interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and literature review. A strong triangulation of information aided in providing a comprehensive picture of the presidential transition that transpired at Northland.
In comparison to the review of current literature on presidential transition, the Bible college stands in stark contrast to its secular counterpart in several ways. I recommend three propositions that are paramount for any Bible college attempting a successful Presidential transition: 1) Bible college leadership must learn the perceived needs and expectations of the constituency before pursuing a presidential transition, 2) Bible colleges must select a president who embraces the embedded culture of the institution, and 3) the new president must be patient in exercising his or her newly bestowed power. These findings presented a new road map for Bible Colleges to follow as they embark on their dangerous journey through the stormy seas of presidential transition. Finally, recommendations for further study were suggested to increase our microscopic knowledge base on presidential transition within the Bible college movement.

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