Date of Award

5-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Advisor

Dr. M. Kennedy

Committee Member

Dr. J. Ballato

Committee Member

Dr. V. Blouin

Committee Member

Dr. L. Saraf

Abstract

Reports of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMM) performance show a relatively high strength and radiation damage resistance when compared their monolithic components. Hardness of NMMs has been shown to increase with increasing interfacial density (i.e. decreasing layer thickness). This interface density-dependent behavior within NMMs has been shown to deviate from Hall-Petch strengthening, leading to higher measured strengths during normal loading than those predicted by a rule of mixtures. To fully understand why this occurs, other researchers have looked at the influence of the crystal structures of the component layers, orientations, and compositions on deformation processes. Additionally, a limited number of studies have focused on the structural stability and possible performance variation between as-deposited systems and those exposed to mechanical and thermal loading.

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