Graduate Research and Discovery Symposium (GRADS)

Title

Antimicrobial effects of natural tenderizing enzymes on different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes on Beef

Advisor

Paul Dawson

Document Type

Poster

Department

Food Technology

Publication Date

Spring 2013

Abstract

Tenderization of beef meat is widely done for increasing consumer acceptance and enhancing shelf life. This study was conducted on meat surface to determine the efficacy of proteolytic enzymes (papain and Actinidin), meat tenderizer enzymes, on the survivability of multiple strains of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes. Two overnight cultures of three strains of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were separately suspended in 1% peptone water and were individually inoculated into beef meat surface (ca. 106 CFU/ml). After 5 minutes attachment time different enzyme concentrations were added. Treated samples were then kept for 3 h at 25°C and 35°C and for 24 h at 5°C. Actinidin concentration (700 mg/ml) tested at 25°C against E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes was the most effective concentrations tested reducing populations by 2.4 and 1.41 log CFU/ml after 3 h, respectively. Papain concentration of (10 mg/ml) was the most effective concentrations tested at 25°C against E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes reducing populations by 1.8 and 0.8 log CFU/ml after 3 h, respectively. These findings suggest that, in addition to the potential for improving the sensory attributes of beef meat, tenderization can enhance their safety and shelf life.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS