Date of Award

5-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Legacy Department

Historic Preservation

Committee Member

Barry Stiefel, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Amalia Leifeste

Committee Member

Benjamin Traywick

Abstract

As a response to growing traffic in Atlanta, almost constant road work has been occurring in the city for the past 75 years. The growth of the city and the ever-changing road system has had dramatic impact on the physical deterioration of the historic fabric of the city. One of the most intense impacts came with the construction and reconstruction of the Interstate 75/85 Connector running north to south through the center of downtown. This research examines impacts of the construction of the interstate in the 1950s and the reconstruction in the 1980s to determine the level of physical deterioration in three historic neighborhoods. Data collected on building use, vacancy rates, and owner-occupancy rates are used to answer the question: did the land use and occupancy of lots in historic neighborhoods change as a result of Atlanta's 75/85 Connector, and if so how enduring were these changes? Data from the study shows that due to the creation of the Connector, a temporary rise in vacancy and decrease in residential rates occurred, couple with lasting increased commercial rates and decreased owner-occupancy. The study also found that the placement of the Connector impacted the degree of change in these data sets.

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