Date of Award

5-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Legacy Department

Human Factors Psychology

Committee Member

Dr. Lee Gugerty, Committee Chair

Committee Member

Dr. Ben Stephens

Committee Member

Dr. Patrick Rosopa

Committee Member

Dr. Johnell Brooks

Abstract

This thesis documents a correlational study of wayfinding experience and survey and route knowledge in a large, complex building. Twelve patient transport personnel who work in a very large, regional hospital facility participated as wayfinding subject matter experts. This correlational study addresses three primary research questions. Do more experienced patient transport personnel have more accurate survey knowledge of a large, complex building than less experienced patient transport personnel? Do more experienced patient transport personnel have more accurate route knowledge of a large, complex building than less experienced patient transport personnel? Do more experienced patient transport personnel choose more efficient routes in a large, complex building than less experienced patient transport personnel? The study measures survey knowledge using a pointing task and a mapping task. The study measures route knowledge and route efficiency using a route diagramming task. Linear and nonlinear regression analyses are used to analyze the data. The results of this study may contribute to a deeper understanding of the relationship between wayfinding experience and survey and route knowledge, as well as offer insights into how to better design wayfinding training materials and methods and building signage.

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