Date of Award

5-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Legacy Department

Entomology

Advisor

Morse, John C

Committee Member

Sharp , Julia

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Using light, flight-intercept, and pitfall traps, 74, 327 specimens of Scarabaeoidea were captured at four golf courses in South Carolina during 2009-2010. Aphodiinae were identified only to the subfamily level and totaled 57,502 specimens. 16,825 specimens in 47 genera and 104 species in the families Ceratocanthidae, Geotrupidae, Hybosoridae, Lucanidae, Passalidae, Scarabaeidae (excluding Aphodiinae), and Trogidae were identified based on morphological characteristics. Similar to other southeastern studies focusing on phytophagous scarabs, the most abundant species consisted of Dyscinetus morator (Fabricius), Euetheola humilis (Burmeister), Cyclocephala lurida Bland, and Hybosorus illigeri Reiche. The most speciose genus captured was Phyllophaga Harris, totaling 22 species. A new state record for Phyllophaga inepta (Horn) is reported. Light traps captured the highest number of specimens (94% of total specimens captured), followed by pitfall trapping (4%), and flight-intercept traps (2%). Light traps captured the highest number of species (83), followed by flight-intercept traps (52), and pitfall traps (15). Flight-intercept traps captured many Cetoniinae and Scarabaeinae species that were not captured in light traps, suggesting that these species may be non-phototactic. Pitfall traps yielded comparatively fewer species, many of which were already present in high numbers in light traps. The highest species diversity occurred at Camden Country Club. The proximity of this location to the convergence of three physiographical regions may explain the unusually high diversity. Male-biased sex ratios were more prevalent in all trap types.

Included in

Entomology Commons

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