Date of Award

5-2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Legacy Department

Educational Leadership

Advisor

Flowers, Lamont A

Committee Member

First , Patricia

Committee Member

Keels Williams , Frankie

Committee Member

Satterfield , James

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand how Jackson State University, a public historically Black university, recruits other race students in the wake of the 2002 Ayers settlement. This settlement included a requirement that historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) increase their non-African American enrollment to at least 10% of their total enrollment by the fall of 2018 and maintain this percentage for 3 years in order to share in the principal of public and private endowment funds. This portion of the settlement was most relevant to this study. Jackson State University was selected as the subject of this case study because it stands to receive the largest share of endowment incentives for increasing its White student enrollment. It also has the largest enrollment of the three public HBCUs in Mississippi.
Literature examining the impact of desegregation litigation on HBCUs, factors attracting White students to HBCUs, and the experiences of White students at HBCUs are explored to provide foundational knowledge. Institutional theory served as the theoretical framework undergirding this study. Interviews of university personnel were conducted. Document analysis also was conducted. Results from this study identified strategies for the successful recruitment of other race students and the impact of the Ayers settlement on the recruitment process.

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